The guide

The different weavings of cotton (among other things!)

You don’t see the difference between chambray and oxford?
You believe that flannel can only be found in the bathroom?
You think that dobby is the name of a dance?
Or, on the contrary, you’re unbeatable and you want to test your knowledge?
Follow the guide!

Before starting, a few clarifications:

At Abbie & Rose, we pay lot of attention to the quality of our products. All our shirts are crafted with 100% natural fabrics (mainly cotton, but also linen for our summer shirts). Cotton offers multiple weave options and this fiber is insulated, absorbent and hypoallergenic. To put simply: cotton is great! That’s why we like to work (or rather play) with this fabric. Therefore, you’ll find below the different textures of our shirts, mostly made with cotton (if it wasn’t enough clear ;)) and sometimes with linen.

This guide is focused on cotton weave, so it is useful if you can distinguish between weft and warp:

The weft refers to the threads that run horizontally on the loom.
The warp refers to the threads that are strung vertically on the loom.


Poplin

The weaving:

Poplin is a plain weave crafted by crossing a doubled weft-thread and a warp-thread with the same colour. Its variation called end-on-end uses different colours for weft and warp.

The essential:

Because of its softness and easy-care, poplin is originally the most common weave for formal shirts. With its smooth texture, poplin is perfect for deep and bright prints. Breathable and fine, poplin has a soft touch on the skin.

The (not so) useful anecdote:

This weave is called poplin because it was invented in the French city of Avignon, also known as : the city of popes.

Oxford

The weaving:

The oxford is the result of crossing a white weft-thread and a coloured doubled warp-thread. The pinpoint is similar, except that the weft-thread alternatively pass over and under two warp-threads, and has a softer touch such as poplin.

The essential:

This weave is perfect for casual shirts. It is durable, breathable and easy-care and often mixed with a button-down collar similar to traditional polo shirts. Sitting between lightness and heaviness, the oxford can be found in various colours and worn in every season.

The (not so) useful anecdote:

Oxford might be invented in 19th century to supply some prestigious universities, such as… Oxford, in the UK.

Twill

The weaving:

Twill is easily recognizable because it shows diagonal weave on texture, due to the shifted crossing between warp-thread and weft-thread.

The essential:

Thick and supple, twill is perfect for warm and textured shirts. With its soft-touch and easy-care, it’s the best match for a strong and sober winter shirt.

The (not so) useful anecdote:

Twill is also the weaving used to make jeans. The jeans brands invented different types of twill over the years: the most famous is the right-hand twill, but there is also the left-hand twill and the broken twill.

Denim

The weaving:

Denim is a type of twill: the weft-thread is white or off-white and the warp-thread is indigo-dyed. It’s the type of weave used to make jeans.

The essential:

Denim has the same advantages as twill: it’s thick and durable. Colour of denim can be light or dark depending on washing out. In the past, the denim shirt was a real work uniform, so it automatically gives a grown and authentic touch to your look. 

The (not so) useful anecdote:

The weave used to make the first jeans may be invented in the French city of Nîmes, that’s why it’s called denim (« de Nîmes » = from Nîmes).

Chambray

The weaving:

Chambray is a plain weave: warp-thread (usually indigo) and weft-thread (mostly off-white) are crossing to create a blue weave with a more or less irregular aspect.

The essential:

Often compared to its cousin denim, chambray is softer and lighter, so it can be worn in all seasons. Originally assimilated to workwear, the chambray shirt is nowadays a must-have of casual men’s wardrobe. To give a fancier, warp-thread, historically indigo, it is sometimes changed for a more unusual colour.

The (not so) useful anecdote:

Before its expansion in the United States, chambray forebear (called cambric) was produced in the North of France, in a city named Cambrais. The word chambray might come from there.

Dobby

The weaving:

Dobby is a plain weave realised on a special loom giving the possibility to change the number of warp-thread of weft-thread during weaving to create patterns and to give more texture to the weave. An alternative to dobby is piqué, which is the type of weaving for polo shirts.

The essential:

Dobby shirts have an inimitable texture, thanks to the micro-patterns created during weaving that give much depth to the weave. Each dobby weave has its own feeling, but all of them remain very subtle.

The (not so) useful anecdote:

The word dobby is a corruption of "draw boy" which refers to the weaver's assistant who used to deform the yarn during weaving to create the patterns. 

Flannel

The weaving:

Flannel is a brushed cotton weave, with a downy feeling. The weave used to create flannel is often heavy, so it’s a perfect match for winter shirts.

The essential:

Flannel is warm while keeping a soft and fluffy touch. It’s a pleasurable weave for winter, worn directly on skin or over a t-shirt. It’s often the common weave for plaid winter shirts, but plain flannels also exist.

The (not so) useful anecdote:

Flannel comes from Scotland, and was originally only composed from wool. By the way, « flannel » means « wool » in Welsh.

Velvet

The weaving:

Velvet is the result of a complex weaving with a warp and two weft, creating a smooth and downy weave. Corduroy is quite similar, but show vertical weaves on texture, more or less thin.

The essential:

With its soft and silky touch, velvet keeps you warm and offers a feeling of cocoon from which you don’t want to exit. Corduroy also gives depth and texture to the fabric. Thin weaves will be more subtle, while thick ones will give a workwear look.

The (not so) useful anecdote:

Corduroy is the corruption of « corde du roi » (« rope of king » in French), because velvet was originally reserved for monarchy and nobility, and because the vertical weaves of corduroy look like ropes.

Voile

The weaving:

Voile cotton is a plain weave, made with fine and extremely resistant yarns.

The essential:

Voile is light and flowing. A voile shirt is soft and breathable. It is the perfect shirt for a hot summer, thanks to its feeling that remains silk.

The (not so) useful anecdote:

In warmer countries, voile is also used as a mosquito net.

Now you're unbeatable on weaves, take a look on our shirts.